Synopsis

After being orphaned at age six, sixteen-year-old Connelly Pierce—who has spent a decade, being passed from family to family, or as often no family at all, but always fighting for her very existence, her right to survive—has given up. Even worse, the system that has controlled her life for all those years is about to give up on her. But just before she is sent into long-term care at a California state mental hospital, a little miracle happens.

An intern at the clinic who has taken an interest in her finds an unopened letter at the bottom of Connelly’s raggedy old knapsack. The letter is from a distant cousin of Connelly’s named Elizabeth Walker, or Liz, who has recently lost her husband Jack, left behind a 57,000 acre ranch in Texas, and has since been looking for Connelly. The intern realizes this is the girl’s last chance. If Cousin Liz won’t help her, or if Connelly won’t accept that help, her life, in any normal sense, may be over. But what the intern doesn’t realize, is that calling that phone number he finds at the bottom of the letter is about to change two women’s lives, forever, in ways neither of them could ever have imagined. 

Review

I have to say that as the final book in a trilogy, it was just okay. I mean, just like the other books this one has its moments of blandness that seems to drag out making it a boring read, but then have its moments of fast-paced excitement that really messes with your emotions! There were a few parts of the book where I was elated, or enraged or just didn’t know how to feel. 

The setting of this book completely contrasts with that of Into the Abyss: Connelly is living on her family’s rich, isolated ranch in Texas. She is “happier” and is painting again, making friends, and finding real love. But her life roller coaster continues which is really frustrating since she has found happiness.

The ending is nearly perfect! I can’t pinpoint what’s missing, but it did leave me content.

So many questions from the previous books are answered here, and it is definitely worth the read. Everything is concluded in a way readers would be happy with.

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

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